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Chinese Woman Sued by TV Star Who Assaulted Her

Chinese Woman Sued by TV Star Who Assaulted Her

Depression Depression(Pixabay)
ByFaith Magbanua October 02, 2018
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Just a few months ago, China was bombarded by a gigantic string of the #MeToo campaigns across the country and while a clear position is not identified in the country, a Chinese woman found herself sued by a TV star she accused for harassing her.

In July 2018, China's entertainment world was faced with the allegation that one of the country's biggest and most beloved TV stars had forcibly groped and kissed an intern after she took a basket of fruit to his room.

The artist, Zhu Jun, known for hosting national television extravaganzas such as the Spring Festival Gala, immediately denied any accusation and proceeded to sue the woman for damaging his reputation and mental well-being.

The woman, only known by her online moniker Xianzi, had finally told on Tuesday, September 25, 2018 that the case will be heard in Beijing's Haidian district court.

Xianzi has now filed a countersuit and is willing to fight the case, thus setting up China's first #MeToo confrontation in court.

The Case in Detail

The case gives a glimpse on how China sees the #MeToo campaign given the fact it has involved dozens of high-profile figures being publicly shamed for alleged sexual misconduct worldwide, especially in Hollywood.

When Xianzi, the 25-year-old victim, posted her 3,000-word account on WeChat, she wasn't expecting a huge amount of attention. However, when her friend Xu Chao re-posted it on China's biggest social media site Sina Weibo - the post immediately went viral.

Meanwhile, the alleged episode is said to have taken place four years ago, but in her account Xianzi alleges that the police told her to drop the accusation because Zhu was a well-known TV host and his "positive impact" on society should make her think twice.

She also claims that the authorities went as far as contacting her parents and said she should keep quiet for their sake.

However, soon after she came forward, Xianzi claimed to have received several threatening phone calls: "Believe it or not, I'll go to your Mom," a deep male voice said in a voice recording she posted later on Weibo.

With no other witnesses or allegations against Zhu Jun, the case looks to be a simple case of his word against hers. But for both women, this is about making a point on a public stage in China about the case.

Meanwhile, Xianzi told in a statement that she would not change her stance: "I don't want society to expect the perfect victim who never makes any mistakes and asks [for] no compensation.

"Many people ask #MeToo victims why you don't make a report to the police immediately. I'm the one who did report to the police four years ago and I didn't receive any justice. Still, there are people who instruct female victims to do this... but not men. I want to correct this by standing up."

Xu Chao had this to say: "What deeply concerns the victims is whether this injury leads to justice or nothing."

She is cynical about China's capacity to allow #MeToo to become a fully-fledged part of the mainstream conversation in the country unlike the way it has elsewhere.

"China is a bit different. There is a gap between public opinion and legislation," she says, but adds: "I won't give up."

 

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